OT Law & NT Ethics – 7: The Law and the Gospel (and Abraham)

It has been a while since I posted a new installment in the series exploring the relationship between Old Testament law and New Testament ethics. Sorry about that. Life has a way…of getting in the way. If you’ve not read the previous installments, well, I would strongly suggest that you grant enough time to do so. There is a madness to the method.

Previous Posts in This Series

Here are the earlier posts:

1 – Prefatory Playfulness
2 – Love and Leviticus 
3 – Practice and Priorities
4 – Abominations
5 – Ritual Impurity
6 – The Ten Commandments

Preface

Now, it may be surprising that, while in a series discussing the relationship between Old Testament law and New Testament ethics, one would include a post focused on the gospel. But it shouldn’t be too surprising, I should think.

We often hear law and gospel set in peculiar opposition, as if you cannot have both, as if you must have either one or the other, as if law vs. gospel. To be forthright, I’d like to challenge that, or at least insist that it needs to be seriously nuanced.

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The Rhetoric of Wrath: Douglas Campbell: Paul, “the Teacher,” and the Gentiles — Part 3 (Christian Gentiles of Romans 2)

“Even though Douglas Campbell grants that the gentiles in question in Galatians were Christian gentiles, he holds that the gentiles in question in Romans 2 are non-Christian gentiles. In this regard, he agrees with the more common conventional reading(s). I disagree and depart from that perspective, holding that the gentiles in question in Romans 2 are Christian gentiles. So, what is DC’s case against this? To this we now turn.”

The Rhetoric of Wrath: Douglas Campbell: Paul, “the Teacher,” and the Gentiles — Part 3 (Christian Gentiles of Romans 2).

Garlington on Galatians

Garlington on GalatiansI just received a copy of the 3rd edition of Don Garlington’s commentary on Galatians: An Exposition of Galatians: A Reading from the New Perspective. Several years ago, in our home Bible study, Don graciously permitted us to use a manuscript version of the first edition of this commentary. I remember well how we appreciated his work, and how it helped facilitate great discussion and contemplation of the challenging import of this very challenging and probing epistle. I anticipate rereading this volume throughout the summer months.